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Keeping the creative energy flowing...

As a successful entrepreneur with strong team building skills, and an art inspired brand, Glen Goldbaum has us inspired.  His business continues to evolve with a new art gallery esque space in the Anderson Building.  This spacious, light drenched space is a bright light on the west side of Red Bank.  We’re intrigued with Glen’s business chops, love of art and background, and wondering what it takes to build a successful business in the beauty industry, so sent a few questions his way…. Thank you Glen for graciously sharing your mojo, background and continuing to bring a touch of cool to Red Bank’s west side. 

And thanks Kristina (uber talent and senior stylist) for sharing some tricks of the trade.  We love hearing what you have to say, and are enamored with the work you do.  (please see some of Kristina’s handy work and her q&a below…)

#lambsandwolves #glengoldbaum #thepeoplebehindthemagic

Lambs & Wolves
Lambs & Wolves
Lambs & Wolves

BB:  You are an owner / operator of a salon that has withstood the test of time.  Please give us some background.  (i.e., the first day you opened the doors to lambs & wolves, the number of employees, your location, etc.)
Glen:  I opened my business in April 2008 with five employees at 72 Bridge Avenue in Red Bank.  I fell in love with the west side of Red Bank as it reminded me of New York City.

 

BB:  When did you know this was the business for you?
Glen:  I knew I wanted to be in a people-driven industry… I thought it would get me a lot of dates early on.  I’m happily married now (Hi Steph!).  The hair industry is a business of movement and that works for me because I’m not good at standing still.

 

BB:  How has the business changed over the years?  What were the popular hair techniques when you first opened?  What are they now?  What techniques have never gone out of style?
Glen:  In many ways it hasn’t changed.  It’s still a feel-good industry and still relationship driven.  It’s more than just a haircut.  Back in the day my first job was at Vidal Sassoon, so it was a lot of strong geometric & architectural haircutting which has never gone out of style.  Classics are classics for a reason.

 

Lambs & Wolves

BB:  We’re in awe of your ability to attract, hire and retain top talent.  Tell us your tricks.
Glen:  No tricks.  We’ve built our reputation over time.  Most of my staff have joined me based on attraction to my background.  I’m always grateful that young talent came my way.  The ability to retain my staff depends on creating energy treating each staff member with respect and encouragement.  I invest in everyone here and everyone is part of the process.  We mean it when we say we are a family.

 

BB:  As a successful entrepreneur, please tell us what is essential in building successful teams?  What is to be avoided at all costs?
Glen:  Communication is essential to building a successful team.  Creating a vision, sharing it, and attracting the right people who support it.  Avoiding compromising on my vision in the name of financial gain or taking shortcuts.

 

BB:  Tell us about your approach in building a brand.
Glen:  Lambs and Wolves has always been an amazing rock and roll band, with just the right amount of wrong.  We are inclusive and free.  My approach is to follow that energy with art, music, hair, and everything in between.

 

 

BB:  What advice would you give to a new business owner?
Glen:  Follow your vision.  Ask a lot of questions to people who know more than you.  Find a mentor.  Expect some stress and sleepless nights.  Know when to enjoy and take pride in what you have built, whatever the size.

 

BB:  When a stylist is being considered for the job, what is the top criteria for you?
Glen:  Kindness and passion above all.    These things are innate and unteachable.  They must be there from the beginning.

 

BB:  What makes a great stylist?  What makes a great customer?
Glen:  A great stylist listens and is in tune with themselves and trends.  A great customer can pay at the front desk (ha).  They follow our vision and support our individuality.

 

BB:  How do you keep morale high with so many competing talents in one space?!
Glen:  At Lambs and Wolves there isn’t much competition.  We support one another and feed off each other’s creativity.  We’re truly a collective.  The seniors teach the juniors.

 

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BB:  Ok, so you are a lover of art and it has clearly influenced the design of your space(s).  Please tell us about your journey with art.  (e.g., when did you start collecting, exploring, using art in your business design, etc.)
Glen:  I’ve been collecting art since I was in my early 20s.  I thought if it moved me, it would move my staff and clients too.  When I opened my business, I wanted it to be more than just a salon; I wanted it to be a chameleon.

 

BB:  Does an art infused space help keep the creative process flowing?
Glen:  I’m a visual person so I’m heavily affected by my environment.  My hope is that my hairdressers are inspired by the art and music in my space and that they will then create better, happier work.

 

BB:  How do you find artists to showcase?
Glen:  In the beginning I would just seek out people I was inspired by.  As I established my space more as an art gallery as well as a salon, the artists began coming to me.

 

BB:  When you personally hit a creative slump, what are some things you do to help get you past it?  Any tips in general for helping spark creative energy?
Glen:  When I find myself in that slump it’s usually a sign that I’m tired.  I step away from my space for a few days to recharge my battery.  I’ll take a quick trip, whether to the city or into nature, to gain reappreciation of what I have.

 

Lambs & Wolves Glen Goldbaum

BB:  What is your favorite part of running your own business?
Glen:  Listening to my music!  Until my front desk changes it.

 

BB:  If you could do one thing differently from the day you first opened, what would it be?
Glen:  I wouldn’t change a thing.  Even when things weren’t the best, it led me to where I am now.

 

BB:  What is your dream collaboration?
Glen:  My dream collaboration would’ve been a David Bowie or Rolling Stones tour.  That’s some badass hair and makeup.

 

 

BB:  What cracks you up?
Glen:  My wife, Stephanie, is the funniest person I know, and she doesn’t even know it.

 

BB:  If you could send a message to the world?
Glen:  Peace, chill, no judgement.  Get a good haircut.  Fix your eyebrows.

 

BB:  Is there a question you wished we had asked?
Glen:  I think we have it covered.  Thanks for having me.

This is what cut and color looks like at Lambs & Wolves

BB:  Tell us what you’re thinking?  Would you please say a few things about Perry’s color? (e.g., what the objective was, why you decided on foils v balayage (or both), special considerations for first time client, etc.).
Kristina:  I gave Perry a partial foil and really focused around her face to make sure she still felt blonde enough.  It’s easy for a blonde who is used to getting a full foil to the root feel like their hair is dark when transitioning to something a little more low maintenance.  It’s important to reassure them they will still be and feel like a blonde when they leave but It will just be more of a modern look with lived in color.  The reason I decided to use foil instead of balayage is because Perry had existing color on her ends that was foiled and if I used a balayage technique I dont think it would have gotten as light as we would have liked.  Balayage is more of a sun kissed look.  Even though I love both techniques it wouldn’t have been the right fit for her.  For a first time client I always make sure I do an extremely thorough consultation with explaining my vision and also them explaining theirs, that way we are all on the same page.  I always ask for photos and make sure we see eye to eye.

ANATOMY OF A MAKEOVER (Part I)

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before

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after cut

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in the process

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after

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kristina & perry

BB:  Tell us a little about your background.  Where are you from?  Any brothers, sisters, pets?
Kristina:  I grew up in Hazlet NJ with my brother Steven, Parents and Grandparents.  We also had a dog growing up and a few smaller pets as well so the house was always full!

 

BB:  When you were a child, what did you dream of being when you grew up?
Kristina:  I honestly always wanted to be a hairdresser!

 

BB:  When did you decide to become a professional colorist?
Kristina:  When I was 17 I decided to do the cosmetology program at my high school and  knew that I wanted to eventually just become a colorist once I got some experience.

 

BB:  How has your career been different than what you imagined?
Kristina:  It truly is better than I could have imagined.  I have an amazingly talented boss with an insane eye for art and work with friends I consider family.

 

BB:  What were the color trends when you first started?  What are they now?
Kristina:  When I first started working in salons the most popular trends were hair painting/ balayage.  They are still very popular depending on the clients desired look.  I also do a ton of foiling!

 

BB:  How long have you worked at lambs & wolves?
Kristina:  About 7 and a half years

 

 

BB:  Tell us about the lambs & wolves creative culture.
Kristina:  Well as you see in our salon art is such a huge part of everything we do.  Hair itself is walking art and we get to create it everyday.

 

BB:  Do you identify as blonde?  What other shades have you been in your life?
Kristina:  I do!  And i’m proud of it!  When I was 19 I dyed my hair almost black it didn’t last very long and back to blonde I went!

 

BB:  Do blondes have more fun?
Kristina:  I sure like to think so ahaha!

 

BB:  You are also trained in cuts.  Tell us about the decision to focus solely on color.
Kristina:  I enjoyed cutting.  I think I was good at it, but it wasn’t my passion.

 

BB:  What is your dream client?
Kristina:  Any blonde or brunette who is looking for that lived in look.  Not done but done look.

 

BB:  Any advice on how clients should think about tipping the colorist, assistant, and person who washes your hair?!  (we’re always worried we don’t get it right!)
Kristina:  I always say 20% of your service cost for your stylist and Assistants I usually recommend anywhere from 5-10$ depending if they applied a shine or not.

 

BB:  Your best color advice in general?
Kristina:  Get the shampoo and conditioner we recommend.  It’s going to keep your hair looking amazing!  I promise you it is worth it.  You don’t want to spend hundreds on your color and then 10$ on a shampoo from target!

 

BB:  What’s the single best experience you’ve ever had on the job?  The most interesting?
Kristina:  Anytime someone has cried happy tears in my chair.  I usually wind up crying with them!

 

BB:  Any good color jokes?
Kristina:  When people say short hair is easier hahah!

 

BB:  What is the best business advice you’ve ever received?
Kristina:  To just trust the process and let the good things come to you.

 

BB:  Do you have a favorite quote?  Ice cream flavor?
Kristina:  “Trust the vibes, energy doesn’t lie”.
Vanilla PB hands down

 

BB:  If you could send a message to the world?
Kristina:  Be kind to everyone.  These are hard times and we could all use a little love.

Lambs & Wolves - Kristina's Work

“This is one of my favorite looks I created recently.  I hand painted this natural brunette.  It’s super melted and blended which is usually every brunette’s goal.  Keeping a lot of the natural dimension.”

Lambs & Wolves - Kristina's Work

“This is one of my favorite blondes to do.  I gave her a full head of foils and tipped out her ends to make sure they brightened up as well.  After she is done processing at the sink I do two toners.  One at the roots to give a more blended/lived in look, which allows the client to lengthen the time in-between color appointments.  And the second toner is a light one on the ends just to cancel out any unwanted tones.”

Lambs & Wolves - Kristina's Work

“This is another brunette I did back over the summer. I usually color her dark but this time she wanted to go a little lighter and brighter. Unlike the first photo I used foils on this one. Reason being foils create heat and if there is previous color existing on their ends you need a little more power to break through it.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAMBS & WOLVES

(Posted: January 2021)